Blogs

FamilyConnect hosts a variety of blogs written by parents who are raising children who are blind or visually impaired. Names on some blogs may have been changed to protect individuals' privacy.


FamilyConnect: A Parent's Voice

This blog is for you—parents of children with visual impairments. We talk about what it's like to be a parent, how to advocate for your child, what new resources we've found, and much more. FamilyConnect also periodically invites experts in all different aspects of raising a visually impaired child to make themselves available to answer your questions.

  • Money Management Education for Children and Teens with Visual Impairments
    by Shannon Carollo on 4/27/2017

    When it comes to teaching our children who are blind or visually impaired to manage money wisely, we may desire a ready-made tutorial, perhaps a 10-step program that equips our children with a lifetime of financial literacy and security. I’m here to remind us that teaching our children financial literacy and money management is an enduring process. It involves our children understanding choice-making; wants vs needs;

  • Prom Makeup Application for Your Blind or Visually Impaired Daughter
    by Shannon Carollo on 4/24/2017

    I’ll never forget the excitement of sitting at the Clinique makeup counter the morning of my first formal school dancenot only was my makeup being professionally applied at minimal cost (with the purchase of at least one product), I was eagerly memorizing the application techniques in effort to replicate them at home. This was the day I was finally given permission to wear foundation, blush, and red-tinted lip gloss and not only for the dance but also for use on a daily basis. I was, in my estimation, now a legit teenager. With prom quickly approaching, I wonder if you have considered providing your teen daughter

  • Structure a Meaningful “Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day” for a Child or Teen Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired
    by Shannon Carollo on 4/19/2017

    It is my intent to draw our attention to “Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day 2017” and devise a plan for making the experience enjoyable, accessible, and tailored to each of our children who are blind or visually impaired. Mark the date, April 27th, 2017, in your calendar and begin making arrangements; this experience is well worth your investment. "Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day," is a day of bonding between parents and children as well as a day wrought with job exploration and exposure to job skills! Utilize the Take Your Daughters and Sons to Work Day Foundation’s


Raising a Child Who Is Blind and...

I am the mother of three and my middle child, Eddie, is officially the "Special Needs Child." Here is my blog to share the joy and pain of having such a unique child.

  • Gaming Day with Students Who Are Visually Impaired
    by Emily Coleman on 4/12/2017

    Last week, we took Eddie to an accessible gaming day sponsored by the Washington Talking Book and Braille Library for students who are blind or visually impaired. The event was organized by a local Teacher of the Visually Impaired (TVI) and included tactile board games, Legos, Play-Doh, lunch, and more. Eddie had a blast, as seen in this overly joyous picture of him. Because blindness is such a low incidence disability, many students in rural districts have never met another kid like them. Even within

  • Accessing an Inaccessible World
    by Emily Coleman on 3/30/2017

    Last month, my book club read “The Rosie Project” by Graeme Simsion. In short, it’s the story of an adult man seeking a wife. A man who presents as autistic and struggles with social connections. There is a scene in the book where he is considering a relationship and wondering if he will find “satisfaction.” The author wrote, “Another world, another life, proximate but inaccessible.” As I read that sentence, I instantly related it to Eddie; partially because he is autistic, but also because he is blind. This character in the book is wanting happiness, connectedness, and relationships like other people. Knowing that he sees it happen every day, going on all around him, and yet, he is unable to access it himself. Just like Eddie. I jokingly call Eddie a “lingerer”

  • International Women’s Day as an Administrator, Teacher, and Mom
    by Emily Coleman on 3/15/2017

    International Women’s Day was March 8th, and all day long, many of the strong female influences in my life came to mind. My Mom, my sister, my aunts, my grandmas, my friends, and my female in-laws. I don’t consider myself a “social butterfly,” but I do gravitate toward book clubs, quilt groups, and more with admirable women. I celebrate all these relationships in different ways and am grateful for their influence in my life As a parent of a blind child, I’ve also met many strong women. Mothers who didn’t expect to raise a child who was blind but have quickly met and raised


Other Blogs From the American Foundation for the Blind


AFB Blog

The American Foundation for the Blind is a national organization expanding possibilities for people with vision loss. AFB experts can be found on Capitol Hill ensuring children have the educational materials they need to learn; in board rooms working with technology companies to ensure that their products are fully accessible; and at conferences ensuring professionals who work with people with vision loss have access to the latest research and information. Through our online resources and information center we communicate directly with people experiencing vision loss, and their families, to give them the resources they need to maintain an independent lifestyle. Follow AFB's blog to learn more about our activities.


CareerConnect Blog

AFB CareerConnect® is an employment information resource developed by the American Foundation for the Blind for job seekers who are blind or visually impaired. The CareerConnect Blog focuses on employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, as well as sharing stories from mentors and other blind people who have found career success.


Visually Impaired: Now What?

Formerly known as the "Peer Perspectives Blog," we have renamed the blog to reflect the purpose more accurately. The posts are written by our team of peer advisors, many of whom are professionals in the field who are blind or visually impaired. The blog features solutions for living with visual impairment resulting from eye conditions such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. It includes posts about living independently, getting around, low vision, technology, cooking, and helpful products.