Blogs

FamilyConnect hosts a variety of blogs written by parents who are raising children who are blind or visually impaired. Names on some blogs may have been changed to protect individuals' privacy.


FamilyConnect: A Parent's Voice

Featuring Susan LaVenture, NAPVI president, this blog is for you—parents of children with visual impairments. Susan talks about what it's like to be a parent, how to advocate for your child, what new resources she's found, and much more. FamilyConnect also periodically invites experts in all different aspects of raising a visually impaired child to make themselves available to answer your questions.

  • High Expectations for Your Graduate with Vision Loss (From Pre-K to High School)
    by Shannon Carollo on 5/24/2016

    For as long as I’ve had the pleasure of blogging for AFB CareerConnect, followed by AFB FamilyConnect, I’ve never said it. I’ve reserved its use. Until now. If you only remember one thing from any blog I’ve ever written, remember this: Your son or daughter needs (read: thrives on) your high expectations. We’ve heard it before, but has it changed the way we parent our children? And how does it impact the way we regard our graduates? This year I have a graduate from Pre-K and a graduate from Kinder; maybe you have a graduate from elementary,

  • Loving on Siblings of a Child with a Disability, and Helping Them Cope
    by Shannon Carollo on 5/18/2016

    We have two children; both girls, sixteen months apart. My oldest was given a “failure to thrive” label very early in life, which has yet to be removed, and my youngest has developed typically. Madeline, the oldest, well, I worry about her! At any given meal I’m questioning, “How can I get Madeline to eat more?” “Is she choking again?” “Is she not eating because…” “Should I be concerned about…”. You probably know the routine. Our mother (or papa!) bear mindsets are protective, worried, and all too often hyper-focused on our child who struggles to meet a milestone, make a friend, or in our case, gain a pound. This isn’t always

  • Teaching Financial Literacy to Our Children with Visual Impairments
    by Shannon Carollo on 5/10/2016

    We know teaching our children to earn and wisely manage money is important, but how do you teach financial literacy to children with visual impairments? Here’s how: Openly discuss finances with your child. Allow your child to practice earning and managing a small allowance. Involve your child in your family’s saving and spending opportunities. Work with your child’s TVI to address accommodations related to vision loss. To assist you on your journey, utilize the


Raising a Child Who is Blind and...

I am the mother of three and my middle child, Eddie, is officially the "Special Needs Child." Here is my blog to share the joy and pain of having such a unique child.

  • Autism Awareness Month: The Child Versus the Label
    by Emily Coleman on 4/4/2016

    Many children who are visually impaired are also diagnosed with autism, including my son Eddie. For Eddie, it was simply because his blindness alone could not explain his developmental delays...and we needed more answers. When he was given the “label” of autism at five, it seemed the best explanation for concerns that could not be explained otherwise. After the diagnosis, we were met with questions and concerns from educators in the field of blindness. Is he really autistic? Are you sure it isn't just

  • The Understanding of a Sibling
    by Emily Coleman on 12/31/2015

    The other morning I woke up with my 7-year-old in bed with me (which happens sometimes) and we were listening to Eddie down the hall. He typically wakes up and immediately turns on his bedside radio, which is how we know he’s up. As we lay there quietly, my daughter started peppering me with questions about her brother who is blind. CC asked, “Mom, why does Eddie like to listen to the radio?” I replied, “It’s a little bit like when you binge watch “Monsters High” on Netflix. He enjoys listening to music, and he can do it all day long.” CC said, “But he doesn’t listen to just music,

  • Quality Eddie Time
    by Emily Coleman on 11/25/2015

    Eddie with a toy bird in a cage While Eddie’s sisters were attending a volleyball camp recently, Eddie and I had a rare opportunity to spend a few hours alone. Although I had plenty of errands to run, and things to do, I decided to take it slow and operate on Eddie time. We began by visiting my sister and her fiancé and then had lunch with James, Eddie’s Dad. Eddie was in a great mood, enjoying being the center of attention for a change. (His younger sister usually steals the show.) After lunch, we still had two hours to spare. I gave him many options and our conversation went a little like this: “Do you want to go to the


Other Blogs From the American Foundation for the Blind


AFB Blog

The American Foundation for the Blind is a national organization expanding possibilities for people with vision loss. AFB experts can be found on Capitol Hill ensuring children have the educational materials they need to learn; in board rooms working with technology companies to ensure that their products are fully accessible; and at conferences ensuring professionals who work with people with vision loss have access to the latest research and information. Through our online resources and information center we communicate directly with people experiencing vision loss, and their families, to give them the resources they need to maintain an independent lifestyle. Follow AFB's blog to learn more about our activities.


CareerConnect Blog

AFB CareerConnect® is an employment information resource developed by the American Foundation for the Blind for job seekers who are blind or visually impaired. The CareerConnect Blog focuses on employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, as well as sharing stories from mentors and other blind people who have found career success.


Visually Impaired: Now What?

Formerly known as the "Peer Perspectives Blog," we have renamed the blog to reflect the purpose more accurately. The posts are written by our team of peer advisors, many of whom are professionals in the field who are blind or visually impaired. The blog features solutions for living with visual impairment resulting from eye conditions such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. It includes posts about living independently, getting around, low vision, technology, cooking, and helpful products.