Blogs

FamilyConnect hosts a variety of blogs written by parents who are raising children who are blind or visually impaired. Names on some blogs may have been changed to protect individuals' privacy.


FamilyConnect: A Parent's Voice

This blog is for you—parents of children with visual impairments. We talk about what it's like to be a parent, how to advocate for your child, what new resources we've found, and much more. FamilyConnect also periodically invites experts in all different aspects of raising a visually impaired child to make themselves available to answer your questions.

  • Goalball: An Overview from the United States Association of Blind Athletes
    by AFB Staff on 5/22/2017

    Editor's Note: Today's blog post provides an overview of goalball, a competitive sport for blind athletes, as well as information on finding teams for various ages. This information has been generously shared from the United States Association of Blind Athletes (USABA) and was originally published on USABA's site. To watch goalball in action, USABA recommends their informational goalball video. What Is Goalball? Goalball is a Paralympic team sport played by athletes who are blind and visually impaired. The sport was introduced as a medal event at the 1976 Paralympic Games in Toronto. However, it originated in 1946 when Austrian, Hanz Lorrenzen and

  • In Italy, “I” Stands for Inclusion, Part 2: A Closer Look at Italy’s Approach to Educating Blind and Visually Impaired Students of Today
    by Francesca Crozier-Fitzgerald on 5/17/2017

    Editor’s Note: In honor of Global Accessibility Awareness Day (Thursday, May 18), we are sharing two stories about the education of children who are blind or visually impaired in Italy. Today’s story dives into Italy’s current approach to educating children with visual impairment. If you missed part one of this series, check out “Gabriele Colantonio Recounts Attending School As a Child with a Visual Impairment.” Closer Look at Italy’s Approach to Educating Visually Impaired Students In

  • In Italy, “I” Stands for Inclusion, Part 1: Gabriele Colantonio Recounts Attending School As a Child with a Visual Impairment
    by Francesca Crozier-Fitzgerald on 5/16/2017

    Editor’s Note: In honor of Global Accessibility Awareness Day (Thursday, May 18), we are sharing two stories about the education of children who are blind or visually impaired in Italy. Today’s story is from Gabriele Colantonio about his experience with different school systems across several regions of Italy. Tune in tomorrow for part two, “A Closer Look at Italy’s Approach to Educating Blind and Visually Impaired Students of Today.” Gabriele Colantonio Recounts Attending School As a Child with a Visual Impairment Since 1977, the Italian Ministry


Raising a Child Who Is Blind and...

I am the mother of three and my middle child, Eddie, is officially the "Special Needs Child." Here is my blog to share the joy and pain of having such a unique child.

  • 3 Helpful Tips When Taking Eddie Somewhere New
    by Emily Coleman on 5/24/2017

    Having a child with special needs can wreak havoc on your social life. Invites may come in for parties or more and the energy it takes to attend is sometimes too much. We often beg forgiveness from our friends when we turn down invitations, but fostering our friendships is important. Instead of always saying no, I’ve found some ways to make a new outing more enjoyable for us and Eddie. Not long ago, I took the kids to a friend’s house for a dinner party. My husband was elsewhere, so I knew it would just be me and our three kiddos. From the moment I told Eddie we were going to a party, he just kept saying, “No. No Party.” Because he can become fixated, I heard “No Party” for almost the whole 20 minutes it took to get there. When we arrived, I spent the first half

  • How Edward Came into the World
    by Emily Coleman on 5/10/2017

    Last week, Eddie turned 12, and it didn’t knock the wind out of me as it has in year’s past. I wasn’t met with fear about his future, anxiety about how much he has to learn, or any measure of grief over the life I once envisioned for him. Instead, it felt very much like a birthday for any kid... a day of celebrating Eddie. At one point, I even browsed through his baby book where I rediscovered the narrative of his birth. Basically, I went to the hospital with his Dad and my sister, was induced because he was late, and had my water broke because it wouldn’t go on its own. Eddie was big; my doctor and a pediatrician were on hand, and after the delivery, everything seemed to be good. All the grandparents rushed the hospital room, we were moved to recovery, and Eddie’s stats were

  • Gaming Day with Students Who Are Visually Impaired
    by Emily Coleman on 4/12/2017

    Last week, we took Eddie to an accessible gaming day sponsored by the Washington Talking Book and Braille Library for students who are blind or visually impaired. The event was organized by a local Teacher of the Visually Impaired (TVI) and included tactile board games, Legos, Play-Doh, lunch, and more. Eddie had a blast, as seen in this overly joyous picture of him. Because blindness is such a low incidence disability, many students in rural districts have never met another kid like them. Even within


Other Blogs From the American Foundation for the Blind


AFB Blog

The American Foundation for the Blind is a national organization expanding possibilities for people with vision loss. AFB experts can be found on Capitol Hill ensuring children have the educational materials they need to learn; in board rooms working with technology companies to ensure that their products are fully accessible; and at conferences ensuring professionals who work with people with vision loss have access to the latest research and information. Through our online resources and information center we communicate directly with people experiencing vision loss, and their families, to give them the resources they need to maintain an independent lifestyle. Follow AFB's blog to learn more about our activities.


CareerConnect Blog

AFB CareerConnect® is an employment information resource developed by the American Foundation for the Blind for job seekers who are blind or visually impaired. The CareerConnect Blog focuses on employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, as well as sharing stories from mentors and other blind people who have found career success.


Visually Impaired: Now What?

Formerly known as the "Peer Perspectives Blog," we have renamed the blog to reflect the purpose more accurately. The posts are written by our team of peer advisors, many of whom are professionals in the field who are blind or visually impaired. The blog features solutions for living with visual impairment resulting from eye conditions such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. It includes posts about living independently, getting around, low vision, technology, cooking, and helpful products.