Blogs

FamilyConnect hosts a variety of blogs written by parents who are raising children who are blind or visually impaired. Names on some blogs may have been changed to protect individuals' privacy.


FamilyConnect: A Parent's Voice

This blog is for you—parents of children with visual impairments. We talk about what it's like to be a parent, how to advocate for your child, what new resources we've found, and much more. FamilyConnect also periodically invites experts in all different aspects of raising a visually impaired child to make themselves available to answer your questions.

  • Back to School Resource Bash for Children with Visual Impairments
    by Shannon Carollo on 8/15/2017

    Whether you’re sending your young child to school for the very first time or sending your high schooler back to the land of academia for the umpteenth time, it’s an exciting, quite nerve-wracking day. While I was referencing the emotions of your child or young adult, I know you feel the tension, anticipation, and perhaps even appreciation as well. Know that whatever you’re feeling, from distress to delight, you’re not alone. If you want to vent to other parents of children with visual impairments, head on

  • Making the Most of "Meet the Teacher" When Your Child Is Visually Impaired
    by Samantha Kelly on 8/14/2017

    As we near the beginning of a new school year, school districts prepare teachers with their class roster and include copies of Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and 504 plans. Teachers of students with visual impairments are often busy delivering braille books, low vision devices, and all of the necessary equipment in place for the student. Meanwhile, parents and children anxiously await

  • Preparing Your Visually Impaired Child for Preschool
    by Shannon Carollo on 8/9/2017

    The big backpack on your tiny little guy is a visual reminder of your baby entering a big-boy world and all the growth and maturation soon to come. He is heading to preschoolit certainly provokes every last emotion, doesn’t it?! It’s exciting. It’s nerve-wracking. It’s bitter-sweet. It, however, needn’t be improvised. You can work alongside your child’s teacher of students with visual impairments, orientation and mobility specialist, and early intervention specialist to help prepare your child for the social, physical, and educational aspects of preschool well before the school year


Raising a Child Who Is Blind and...

I am the mother of three and my middle child, Eddie, is officially the "Special Needs Child." Here is my blog to share the joy and pain of having such a unique child.

  • Tears, Language Delays, and Seeking an Answer
    by Emily Coleman on 8/16/2017

    Last night, when we went into Eddie’s room to say goodnight, we found him sitting on the edge of his bed with his lower lip sticking out and giant tears quietly sliding down his face. We sat down on either side of him, but his continued silence and steady crying gave us no answers. Eddie is 12, and he still can’t tell us what’s wrong. He still can’t say if he’s hurt, why he’s sad, or if we can help him. As I’ve shared hundreds of times, Eddie is blind, but he’s also autistic. He lacks most expressive language and what he says is often a repetition of something he’s heard, which is called echolalia. Most days, we can find out what he wants or needs through a series of well-versed questions. Other days, his bank of scripted responses is empty and frustration

  • Outdoor Education for Kids Who Are Blind
    by Emily Coleman on 7/12/2017

    I just returned home from a unique opportunity for educators and especially unique when considering teaching children who are blind. It’s called "American Wilderness Leadership School" offered through Safari Club International. The purpose of the camp is to offer curriculum and perspective to teachers surrounding conservation of wildlife and resources. I attended to find new ways to educate our youth who are blind about the outdoors and resource management. While in Jackson, Wyoming, we spent the days listening to speakers, going on field trips, getting trained to teach archery in schools,

  • Wax Museum and No Man’s Land
    by Emily Coleman on 6/28/2017

    Having a child in special education can feel like they are in "No Man’s Land," especially if they spend a lot of time away from their peers as Eddie does. His unique needs due to autism and blindness make it hard for us to know where he specifically belongs. Because of this, we find ourselves in the dark sometimes when it comes to school activities and information. This spring, we were excited to be included from the beginning with the school’s popular "museum" event. Every year, his elementary school puts on a "Wax Museum" where they pick a famous character, dress like them, and prepare a short speech. They stand posed in the cafeteria, and spectators stop by and hand them a ticket if they want to hear their presentation. Eddie’s school started reminding us of this event


Other Blogs From the American Foundation for the Blind


AFB Blog

The American Foundation for the Blind is a national organization expanding possibilities for people with vision loss. AFB experts can be found on Capitol Hill ensuring children have the educational materials they need to learn; in board rooms working with technology companies to ensure that their products are fully accessible; and at conferences ensuring professionals who work with people with vision loss have access to the latest research and information. Through our online resources and information center we communicate directly with people experiencing vision loss, and their families, to give them the resources they need to maintain an independent lifestyle. Follow AFB's blog to learn more about our activities.


CareerConnect Blog

AFB CareerConnect® is an employment information resource developed by the American Foundation for the Blind for job seekers who are blind or visually impaired. The CareerConnect Blog focuses on employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, as well as sharing stories from mentors and other blind people who have found career success.


Visually Impaired: Now What?

Formerly known as the "Peer Perspectives Blog," we have renamed the blog to reflect the purpose more accurately. The posts are written by our team of peer advisors, many of whom are professionals in the field who are blind or visually impaired. The blog features solutions for living with visual impairment resulting from eye conditions such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. It includes posts about living independently, getting around, low vision, technology, cooking, and helpful products.