Blogs

FamilyConnect hosts a variety of blogs written by parents who are raising children who are blind or visually impaired. Names on some blogs may have been changed to protect individuals' privacy.


FamilyConnect: A Parent's Voice

This blog is for you—parents of children with visual impairments. We talk about what it's like to be a parent, how to advocate for your child, what new resources we've found, and much more. FamilyConnect also periodically invites experts in all different aspects of raising a visually impaired child to make themselves available to answer your questions.

  • BrailleBlaster Question and Answer: Braille Software for Everyone
    by AFB Staff on 1/10/2018

    Editor’s Note: Parents, would you like to create braille at home for your child? Now you can using the American Printing House for the Blind's (APH) BrailleBlaster(tm) software. All you need is access to an embosser or a refreshable braille display, and you can provide materials in braille for your visually impaired child. We've partnered with APH to answer your questions about this new, free software. Read today's post, share your questions and comments, and tune in on Wednesday, January 17th, as we answer your questions about this helpful resource. Home Is Where the Braille

  • How Does a Visually Impaired Child or Teen Travel in the Cold, Snow, and Ice?
    by Shannon Carollo on 1/8/2018

    I can hear it nowFrozen’s beloved Anna grasping her stiff, emerald dress and murmuring, cold, cold, cold, cold, cold as she tiptoes through the snow. Then there are the famous Dalmatians trudging through knee-deep snow, Mama, my ears are cold and my nose is cold. Disney does a fine job of depicting the distress of traveling in wintry weather when unprepared. So, how do we elude those scenarios with our children who are blind or visually impaired? How does one prepare for winter weather orientation and mobility?

  • The Indelible Impact of Louis Braille
    by Francesca Crozier-Fitzgerald on 1/2/2018

    When I decided to go back to school to become a teacher of students with visual impairments, I shared my decision with a friend and teacher’s assistant in special education for over 21 years. While her class is not specifically for students with visual impairments, she has always made a point to read the story of Louis Braille to her students and to use it as an example


Raising a Child Who Is Blind and...

I am the mother of three and my middle child, Eddie, is officially the "Special Needs Child." Here is my blog to share the joy and pain of having such a unique child.

  • Pushing Limits and Stepping Back
    by Emily Coleman on 1/18/2018

    Eddie wakes up everyday asking what is going to happen next. He likes a schedule, prefers to stick to it, and adding something new can make him uneasy. Children who are blind can be unsure about new experiences. Being unable to predict what will be expected and unsure if they will be successful can be scary. However, we keep pushing him so that his experiences broaden and his ability to participate in life expands. Because Eddie isn’t an only child, he is often asked to attend events to support his sisters. These include games, band concerts, girl scout functions, and more. He isn’t

  • A Holiday Concert Success
    by Emily Coleman on 1/3/2018

    Eddie is participating in middle school band this year. As a sixth grader, it’s the year they are learning musical instruments, and this matches his skill level. He is able to play the melody of most tunes on the piano by ear and spends much of his free time tinkering. We knew integrating him into band wouldn’t be easy because he isn’t a huge fan of playing along with others. He prefers his own musical talents, and when others try to join him, they are quickly excused. When sitting down next to him on the piano bench, I usually get a light push and the familiar comment, Bye, Mom.

  • The Importance of Relationships
    by Emily Coleman on 12/13/2017

    We know friendships build self-esteem and offer a sense of belonging that can be hard to find. There are actually additional benefits that we cannot ignore for our kids who are blind and may have additional disabilities. I know it’s hard to imagine, but their relationships with kids may also be the key to employment. Eddie is part of a very small community. From the first day of kindergarten, the kids knew who he was and sought him out. He’s been with them for six and a half years, and even though he has challenges with sensory regulation, language, and more... many of them don’t seem to notice. They still say Hi, while rarely getting a response. They make a point of talking to him, even though his scripted response remains, I am fine. While


Other Blogs From the American Foundation for the Blind


AFB Blog

The American Foundation for the Blind is a national organization expanding possibilities for people with vision loss. AFB experts can be found on Capitol Hill ensuring children have the educational materials they need to learn; in board rooms working with technology companies to ensure that their products are fully accessible; and at conferences ensuring professionals who work with people with vision loss have access to the latest research and information. Through our online resources and information center we communicate directly with people experiencing vision loss, and their families, to give them the resources they need to maintain an independent lifestyle. Follow AFB's blog to learn more about our activities.


CareerConnect Blog

AFB CareerConnect® is an employment information resource developed by the American Foundation for the Blind for job seekers who are blind or visually impaired. The CareerConnect Blog focuses on employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, as well as sharing stories from mentors and other blind people who have found career success.


VisionAware Blog

Timely news and interviews relating to vision loss, including the latest updates in medical research.


Visually Impaired: Now What?

Formerly known as the "Peer Perspectives Blog," we have renamed the blog to reflect the purpose more accurately. The posts are written by our team of peer advisors, many of whom are professionals in the field who are blind or visually impaired. The blog features solutions for living with visual impairment resulting from eye conditions such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. It includes posts about living independently, getting around, low vision, technology, cooking, and helpful products.