Blogs

FamilyConnect hosts a variety of blogs written by parents who are raising children who are blind or visually impaired. Names on some blogs may have been changed to protect individuals' privacy.


FamilyConnect: A Parent's Voice

This blog is for you—parents of children with visual impairments. We talk about what it's like to be a parent, how to advocate for your child, what new resources we've found, and much more. FamilyConnect also periodically invites experts in all different aspects of raising a visually impaired child to make themselves available to answer your questions.

  • A Meaningful and Accessible Halloween for Children with Visual Impairments
    by Samantha Kelly on 10/23/2017

    Halloween is a favorite day of the year for many childrencandy, costumes, and fall activities, how could it not be?! Your child with a visual impairment can be easily included in all things Halloween and activities leading up to Halloween. Here are a few ideas. Trick-or-Treating If you choose to participate in trick or treating in your neighborhood or to attend a local community Trunk or Treat, your child may want to dress up. When picking out a costume, remember your child's preferences and how some costumes present sensory issues. There are many creative ways to

  • New Article: How to Master Cardinal Directions
    by Shannon Carollo on 10/19/2017

    You intend to teach your child who is blind or visually impaired orientation and mobility concepts, so you’d like to use compass/cardinal directions to state which direction you’re driving or walking. The only problem is, if you’re like most, cardinal directions aren’t exactly on your list of things mastered. The temptation arises to simply let the mobility specialist help your child master this technique in due time. <img

  • FamilyConnect’s Latest Article Series: Orientation and Mobility for Blind and Visually Impaired Babies, Preschoolers, Grade Schoolers, and Teenagers
    by Shannon Carollo on 10/16/2017

    If your child is blind or visually impaired, your child’s education (from birth through the completion of high school) should include more than the core curriculum. It should include the expanded core curriculum, which provides your child with the skills needed to not only access the core curriculum but also to live a satisfying


Raising a Child Who Is Blind and...

I am the mother of three and my middle child, Eddie, is officially the "Special Needs Child." Here is my blog to share the joy and pain of having such a unique child.

  • Our Role in Defining Our Kids
    by Emily Coleman on 10/18/2017

    I was recently at the American Printing House for the Blind Annual Meeting and had a discussion with educators about the role of parents in helping others understand our kids. I was sharing my opinion (as usual) about how parents have to take the lead on this to make others understand our children outside of their labels. For vision, ophthalmologists and optometrists provide the technical report. They diagnosis our kids, tell us what (if any) glasses they need, and while using very big words, explain why our children are blind or visually impaired. Then, the

  • The Perfect Day
    by Emily Coleman on 10/4/2017

    I have written many times about the benefit of recreation for our son, Eddie, and for kids like him. I’ve talked about exposure to activities so he can simply learn how to have fun. Recently, we went on a family bike ride with our close friends, and the benefits were even more than we expected. We live in the Pacific Northwest, and we’ve heard many rave reviews about the Hiawatha trail. It’s a bike ride on the Montana/Idaho border that follows an old train route. It goes through tunnels, over train tressels, and the entire path is downhill. Based on the downhill part, we knew it could be a good fit for Eddie... and if I’m being honest, for me too. We loaded up the bike we received from the NW Association for Blind Athletes and the Pacific Foundation for

  • Advocacy Without Apology
    by Emily Coleman on 9/27/2017

    As a parent of a child who is blind with additional disabilities, I feel like apologizing a lot. I’m telling strangers I’m sorry because my son might touch them or their things in passing. I might apologize if he calls out or sings loudly in quiet settings. I might even apologize to family and friends when we can’t attend events because sometimes it’s just too hard. At school, I feel like apologizing because he might disrupt class. I feel bad that his behavior is sometimes hard to manage. I even want to apologize to the community because his education is expensive. The urge to


Other Blogs From the American Foundation for the Blind


AFB Blog

The American Foundation for the Blind is a national organization expanding possibilities for people with vision loss. AFB experts can be found on Capitol Hill ensuring children have the educational materials they need to learn; in board rooms working with technology companies to ensure that their products are fully accessible; and at conferences ensuring professionals who work with people with vision loss have access to the latest research and information. Through our online resources and information center we communicate directly with people experiencing vision loss, and their families, to give them the resources they need to maintain an independent lifestyle. Follow AFB's blog to learn more about our activities.


CareerConnect Blog

AFB CareerConnect® is an employment information resource developed by the American Foundation for the Blind for job seekers who are blind or visually impaired. The CareerConnect Blog focuses on employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, as well as sharing stories from mentors and other blind people who have found career success.


VisionAware Blog

Timely news and interviews relating to vision loss, including the latest updates in medical research.


Visually Impaired: Now What?

Formerly known as the "Peer Perspectives Blog," we have renamed the blog to reflect the purpose more accurately. The posts are written by our team of peer advisors, many of whom are professionals in the field who are blind or visually impaired. The blog features solutions for living with visual impairment resulting from eye conditions such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. It includes posts about living independently, getting around, low vision, technology, cooking, and helpful products.