Browse By Topic: Getting Around

The Perfect Day

I have written many times about the benefit of recreation for our son, Eddie, and for kids like him. I’ve talked about exposure to activities so he can simply learn how to have fun. Recently, we went on a family bike ride with our close friends, and the benefits were even more than we expected. We live in the Pacific Northwest, and we’ve heard many rave reviews about the Hiawatha trail. It’s a bike ride on the Montana/Idaho border that follows an old train route. It goes through tunnels, over train tressels, and the entire path is downhill. Based on the downhill part, we knew it could be a good fit for Eddie... and if I’m being honest, for me too. We loaded up the bike we received from the NW Association for Blind Athletes and the Pacific Foundation for


It’s Only a Cabbage

Running errands can be tricky with any children, anytime. I like to be efficient and purposeful when getting things done, and kids don’t really work that way. I recently had a high need for food and more and ended up taking my two youngest to town, including my son who is blind. We started at a bakery due to gathering Mother's Day treats for my pregnant sister, and it was a good excuse for baked goods. We found a parking space near the front, a manageable line, a gluten free brownie for my son, and an open table near a window. Eddie loved the snack and a dog passing by had to


3 Helpful Tips When Taking Eddie Somewhere New

Having a child with special needs can wreak havoc on your social life. Invites may come in for parties or more and the energy it takes to attend is sometimes too much. We often beg forgiveness from our friends when we turn down invitations, but fostering our friendships is important. Instead of always saying no, I’ve found some ways to make a new outing more enjoyable for us and Eddie. Not long ago, I took the kids to a friend’s house for a dinner party. My husband was elsewhere, so I knew it would just be me and our three kiddos. From the moment I told Eddie we were going to a party, he just kept saying, “No. No Party.” Because he can become fixated, I heard “No Party” for almost the whole 20 minutes it took to get there. When we arrived, I spent the first half