Holiday...Parties

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Yes, it is another holiday post. This time of year certainly gives me a lot to talk about when it comes to my son with a visual impairment. Today, Eddie’s kindergarten class had their holiday party. Because Eddie participates in class whenever he can (which means whenever he is not throwing a tantrum), his Dad and I wanted to attend. I mean, why wouldn’t we? This is his class and these are his peers; in the small town we live in, they will always be his peers.

First off, we walked through the front doors of the school and we heard Eddie wailing down the hall. I think to myself, what a great start! (Insert sarcasm) The other parents, siblings, and students are moving into the classroom and we are moving down the hall to find our loud son. Come to find out, he simply was mad and tired because it was almost the end of the day.

I left Dad to wait with Eddie while his sister and I went to his classroom. The other kids were singing for their parents and I was surprised that I didn’t feel upset. Sometimes, the sight of his peers acting in a typical way makes me sad. Nothing is more typical than a class of kindergarteners singing Rudolph. This time though, I didn’t mind; maybe because I see him included whenever he is willing and maybe because my friend’s children were in this class. Either way, I was happy to be there enjoying how adorable these kids were, even if Eddie was not with them.

Once word spread to Eddie that there were cookies and snacks in his classroom, he immediately appeared. My son isn’t one to miss out on a treat. He wandered right through the classroom with 26 children and their parents and happily sat at his desk eating a cookie. I was surprised that the sheer crowd didn’t get to him and proud that he participated as much as he did.

Just like the other parents, we were given special gifts made by (or with) Eddie and Eddie was given a present from his teacher. Nothing happened that didn’t include him, except for what he wouldn’t participate in. I was so happy for the inclusion I saw from the staff and his peers. No, it wasn’t a typical holiday party where my son stood alongside his friends and sang songs. But he did sit with his peers, eating a cookie, and laughing along with a holiday video. That sounds pretty typical to me.

Topic:
Holidays
There are currently 2 comments

Re: Holiday...Parties



What a great post and I can totally relate. A lot of my biggest challenges involve adapting my "expectations". We went to a Christmas party at the school for the blind that follows my boys, and the biggest victory for me was that they sat in the lunch room with 100-150 people and didn't mind the noise. They didn't make crafts, or participate in the games, but it was a success...even if Gavin threw up on the two of us early on! He loved the cookies a little too much :) Merry Christmas Emily and thank you for sharing with us.


Re: Holiday...Parties



Having a visually impaired Kindergartener also - I think the idea of the parties are more intense for the parents than the kids. Our daughter went to hers and had a wonderful time. The teacher was close by and modified some of the crafts so that Sami could do them. I agree you learn to enjoy the small things they do even if the other kids are doing more.


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